LOADING ...

     718-888-8888

About Us
AAA Kanwal Khurana loved living in Cleveland. He and his wife had moved from the suburbs to an apartment in the city in December. “It’s beautiful,” he said. “You can see the whole downtown.”

But less than two months later, Mr. Khurana and his wife had just parked their car across the street from the building when they heard someone say, “go back to your own country.” The next morning, they discovered that someone had slashed all four of their tires.

Mr. Khurana, 63, is retired from his job writing contracts for Cuyahoga County, and his wife is a homemaker. They help their son pay his tuition at Kent State. They have car insurance, but still had to come up with a $500 co-payment to have their car towed and repaired, plus the fee to rent a car in the meantime.

The Khuranas reached out to city and state officials for help paying their bills. They discovered, as many victims of hate and harassment do, that getting financial assistance isn’t always easy. The Khuranas reached out to city and state officials for help paying their bills. They discovered, as many victims of hate and harassment do, that getting financial assistance isn’t always easy. The Khuranas reached out to city and state officials for help paying their bills. They discovered, as many victims of hate and harassment do, that getting financial assistance isn’t always easy.
Our Founder

China’s first domestically built aircraft carrier slipped into the sea for the first time on Wednesday, after days of publicity celebrating the impending launch as a milestone in President Xi Jinping’s drive to extend China’s military reach far beyond its shores.

Senior military and government officials watched as a champagne bottle was smashed on the bow and as the 1,033-foot gray hull of the carrier eased into the water at Dalian, a northeastern port, the Chinese military news media reported. The ship, festooned with red national flags and banners, then stopped next to the dock.

The launch “signified a major stage of progress of our country’s indigenous design and construction of aircraft carriers,” a news bulletin from the People’s Liberation Army said. It said the carrier would undergo more testing and fitting of equipment before trials in the water.

The carrier launch comes as tensions rise over China’s activities in the South China Sea and North Korean’s nuclear ambitions. China is entangled in maritime disputes with several Asian countries, including Japan, the Philippines and Vietnam. India is also wary of China’s growing presence in the Indian Ocean, and Australia is responding to China’s naval buildup with its own.China’s two aircraft carriers are no match in size, power and endurance for those of the United States Navy, which keeps 10 carriers and has two under construction. President Trump said last month that he would strengthen the Navy.

Yet the launch conveyed that China intended to build a navy that could not be beaten by other Asian countries, said Patrick M. Cronin, the senior director of the Asia-Pacific Security Program at the Center for a New American Security in Washington.

“With each new aircraft carrier, China is sending a signal that it has no peer among its neighbors,” he said.

China launched its first aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, in 2011, after buying and equipping its rusting Soviet-era hull from Ukraine in 1998. The new carrier is built along similar lines, although it appears slightly larger and more advanced, analysts said. The vessel may need three or so years before it is fully equipped, tested and commissioned for missions.